17.9 C
London
Friday, July 12, 2024

78th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. Memories of Zdzisława Włodarczyk, a former prisoner of KL Auschwitz

Must read

- Advertisement -


On the 78th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, former KL Auschwitz prisoner Zdzisława Włodarczyk recalled the conditions in the concentration camp and how she ended up there. – Mom got the number 85 281. I got the next number. My brother got 192,798, she said. ‘Today, standing here at the Birkenau memorial site, I am horrified to hear the news from the East,’ she admitted.

Today we celebrate the 78th anniversary of the liberation of the German Nazi concentration and extermination camp Auschwitz. The leitmotiv of the event is the process of creating and expanding the system of dehumanization and genocide in Auschwitz, which was particularly strongly defined by the words of the survivor Marian Turski: “Auschwitz did not fall from the sky“.

>> Marian Turski: Until February 24, I witnessed history. Since February 24, you are them

“God, where have we come from?”

During the celebrations, Zdzisława Włodarczyk, a former prisoner of KL Auschwitz, spoke.

- Advertisement -

– I was eleven years old, my brother was seven, when from the transit camp in Pruszków we were herded to freight wagons. Someone shouted, “Where are we going?” The answer was: “to a village near Krakow”. We were the first transport from the Warsaw Uprising, from the first days. we drove a long time. My dad watched the train through the crack of the car the whole way. In the evening we drove up to some buildings. And then I heard my father’s voice of despair. He grabbed his head, hit it against the wall of the car and cried: “God, where have we come from? Where have we come from?” I also looked through the crack, I saw a white plate with a black inscription: “Auschwitz” – she recalled.

– Men separately, women with children separately. We were led along the wire. We’ve been walking for a long time. There were buildings, a barrack. We were led to it. The barrack was empty, we stayed there all night. In the morning I said that men were sitting under the barracks. Dad is there. We spent the whole day together. Men were not allowed to enter the barracks. People were looking for friends, families, talking among themselves. Late in the afternoon, my mother told me to go to the barracks, she stayed with my father. That was the last time I saw my dad, she continued.

Zdzislaw WłodarczykPAP/Zbigniew Meissner

In the camp, she said, women had clothes “that they managed to grab”, while children received clothes that were “stiff from disinfection”. – We were waiting for the numbers, they gave us on rags, they did not tattoo. Mom got the number 85 281. I got the next number. My brother got 192,798. Only then did we get the first piece of bread. Small a loaf of bread divided into four for adults and one-eighth for us children,” she described.

>> “Wounded by Auschwitz, what they went through will always carry inside them”

– On January 17, we were lined up for roll call. We were given a double portion of bread. We were about to leave, we were lined up in blocks. Before us were the mothers, we stood behind the mothers. The procession of people set off. The older prisoner rejected my brother as unfit to march. I wanted to inform my mother, I started screaming, but my mother didn’t hear it. An SS man jumped up to me, hit me very hard in the face, and I turned around. I crouched down so he wouldn’t hit me again. I was automatically left behind. I didn’t care anymore. I jumped out of line and ran to my brother so he wouldn’t be left alone. So we stayed at the camp. Her mother didn’t know about it, she said. At that time, as she said, she took care of her siblings, babushka z Belarus.

Włodarczyk continued that one day, in the evening, three officers came to the room where she was. – One was tall, had a cap. I understood him, although I don’t know if he said in Polish or in Russian: “children, what are you doing here?”. He was surprised. He told us to be locked in a room because this is the front and they can kill us. They brought us a cauldron of tomato soup. It was the first cooked meal, she admitted.

– I heard that a group of women want to leave the camp, go home. I didn’t know where, which way. But I decided that my brother and I would join them. We left the camp early in the morning. We walked. There were a lot of corpses there. There was a lot of snow. Some farmer gave us a ride in a wagon, then a military truck drove by. He took us all and drove us to Krakow, to the Red Cross, she said.

– Today, standing here at the Birkenau memorial site, I am horrified to hear news from the east that there is a war there. The Russian troops that liberated us here are leading us war in Ukraine. Why? Why is there such a policy? she asked. – Mom passed on the march, came back very sick. Dad died. We were alone, she concluded.

Zdzisława Włodarczyk at the celebration of the 78th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. The whole speechTVN24

SEE THE INTERVIEW WITH ZDZISŁAWA WŁODARCZYK FROM 2019:

Zdzislaw Włodarczyk. "We knew that those who had to leave their luggage went straight to the gas chambers"


Zdzislaw Włodarczyk. “We knew that those who had to leave their luggage went straight to the gas chamber”– This loneliness, this struggle for existence, this enduring is very hard. This is not going to be conveyed – admitted Zdzisława Włodarczyk in an interview with Magda Łucyan, a reporter from “Fakty” TVN.TVN24

Main photo source: PAP/Zbigniew Meissner



Source link

More articles

- Advertisement -

Latest article