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80th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. “It was the beginning of an uprising against hatred”

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Jews who tried to resist, of course, did not succeed, they were literally crushed, but it was a desire to do something, said CNN journalist Dana Bash, who on Wednesday attended the celebrations of the 80th anniversary of the outbreak of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. The journalist of the American station Wolf Blitzer, who also visited Warsaw, quoted touching stories of people who survived the Holocaust. “I can’t imagine a mother or father having to say goodbye to a child in order to save that child from death in the camp,” he said.

On Wednesday at noon in front of the Monument to the Ghetto Heroes in Warsaw with the participation of, among others, president Andrzej DudaWest German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier, President Israel Isaak Herzog, Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki, representatives of the Polish government, Jewish and military circles, and the clergy, the main celebrations of the 80th anniversary of the outbreak of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising took place. The day before, the March of the Living took place in the former German Auschwitz-Birkenau camp.

Both ceremonies were attended by journalists from the American CNN station Dana Bash and Wolf Blitzer, who spoke with Marcin Wrona, the correspondent of “Fakty” TVN on Wednesday.

Dana Bash and Wolf Blitzer. The whole conversation with Marcin WronaTVN24

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Bash: This was the beginning of an uprising against hate

This was the beginning of an uprising against hate, the beginning of an uprising against the monstrous attacks of the Nazis, the Germansall over Europe,” said Bash, referring to the uprising in the Warsaw Ghetto. She added that “if the Allies had not stopped them, it would have spread all over the world.”

Recalling the ghetto uprising, Bash stated that “Jews who tried to resist obviously didn’t succeed, they were literally crushed, but it was a desire to do something.”

Wolf Blitzer recalled the stories of Holocaust survivors he heard during his visits to Warsaw and Auschwitz. – One of the most moving things is when I heard about women, then 3, 4, 5-year-old girls, whose mothers had to give them up to take them to a safe country, to leave Poland – he said.

“I can’t imagine a mother or father having to say goodbye to a child in order to save that child from the Nazis, from death in the camp,” he said.

Main photo source: TVN24



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