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Tuesday, May 28, 2024

Brazil. A beach full of turtles that have hatched from their eggs. See the video

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Hundreds of thousands of young arrau turtles, called South American river turtles, have emerged from breeding grounds in western Brazil along the Guaporé River. The environmental organization showed a recording of this event. The annual nesting and hatching of turtles in this place is considered the largest single concentration of these animals on Earth.

At the end of September, about 80,000 adult female arrau turtles (Podocnemis expansa) gathers on the beaches along the river that flows between Brazil and Bolivia to dig nests and lay eggs. Hatching of the young begins in mid-December and lasts until January.

When the young hatch, they emerge from under the sand and spread along the beach to finally end up in the water. The beach, which is teeming with juveniles, can be seen in the recording published by the Wildlife Conservation Society and shared by Reuters.

Turtles hatched on a river in BrazilReuters/Wildlife Conservation Society/Ecovale

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Turtles hatched on a river in BrazilReuters/Wildlife Conservation Society/Ecovale

“It can be called a miracle of nature”

– More than 60,000 female turtles gather here to nest. It is an amazing sight and a great event – said German Forero-Medina from the organization. “What is happening here right now can be called a spectacle or a miracle of nature,” he said. – We are on a river which is actually the border between Bolivia and Brazil. So turtles nest in the areas of both these countries. Therefore, it is very important that we cooperate and coordinate our actions to protect this species – he said.

It is believed to be the largest single concentration of turtles on Earth.

Arrau turtles are the largest freshwater turtles in South America. Adult individuals reach over a meter in length and weigh about 90 kilograms.

Turtles hatched on a river in BrazilReuters/Wildlife Conservation Society/Ecovale

Turtles hatched on a river in BrazilReuters/Wildlife Conservation Society/Ecovale

Main photo source: Reuters/Wildlife Conservation Society/Ecovale



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