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Christian Leaders’ Unprecedented Appeal on Climate Change. By Pope Francis, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and Patriarch of Constantinople Bartholomew

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“Whatever your faith or vision of the world may be, let’s hear the cry of the Earth,” three religious Christian leaders wrote in a joint appeal on climate change. Pope Francis, the Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Bartholomew in an unprecedented document assessed that there had been a “critical moment” and this was an opportunity to “repent and take a decisive step back.”

An unprecedented joint appeal to defend the climate was made by three religious Christian leaders – Pope Francis, Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Bartholomew – ahead of the UN Climate Change Conference COP26 in November in Glasgow.

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“Regardless of faith and vision of the world, let us hear the cry of the Earth,” they called in the first such message in history, published on Tuesday in the Vatican.

Pope FrancisPAP / EPA / VATICAN MEDIA HANDOUT

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Appeal of Christian leaders. “Tomorrow could be even worse”

Religious leaders called on everyone to contribute to “choosing life” for the sake of the planet and to pray for world leaders ahead of a conference in Scotland, which also includes the pope’s election.

Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople BartholomewOnur Coban / Anadolu / Abaca / PAP

Writing about the destruction of the natural environment and climate change, Franciszek, Archbishop Welby and Bartłomiej stated that “today we are paying the price, tomorrow may be even worse”. “This is a critical moment. The future of our children and our common home depends on it,” they said. In their opinion, there is an opportunity to “repent and take a decisive step back.”

They pointed out that biodiversity loss, environmental destruction and climate change are “the inevitable consequences of our actions because we have greedily used up more of the Earth’s resources than the planet can handle.” But – as they added – “we are also faced with profound injustice.” “The people who experience the most catastrophic consequences of these abuses are the poor of the planet, who are less responsible for causing them,” he added.

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin WelbyYui Mok / Avalon / Photoshot / PAP

Main photo source: PAP / EPA / VATICAN MEDIA HANDOUT



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