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Paris. Hundreds protesting in the streets against police violence after Nahel’s death. Despite the ban on demonstrations

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Hundreds of people protested in the streets of Paris on Saturday against a ban on marches against French police violence. The demonstration took place a week after the riots caused by the death of 17-year-old Nahel, who was shot dead by a policeman during an intervention in Nanterre.

A week after the riots caused by the death of 17-year-old Nahel by a policeman in Nanterre, several hundred people expressed their opposition to the a ban on marching against French police violence.

Read also: Who was Nahel, a 17-year-old shot dead by Nanterre police

The demonstration was called by the family of Adama Traore, a black Frenchman whose death in police custody in 2016 is the reason for annual protests. Organizers sought to move the demonstration to the center of the capital after it was banned by police in Beaumont-sur-Oise, a suburb of Paris where Traore died.

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Protests in the streets of Paris after the death of 17-year-old NahelEPA

Protests in the streets of Paris after the death of 17-year-old NahelEPA

Paris. No demonstration due to tensions

Paris police said in a decision published on its website that it had banned the planned demonstration, citing “a context of tensions”. Officers dispersed the crowd from Republic Square, pushing several hundred people towards neighboring streets.

– In France we still enjoy freedom of speech, but freedom of assembly in particular is under threat,” Felix Bouvarel, a health worker who attended the rally despite the ban, which he called “shocking,” told Reuters.

Read also: French authorities ban march in memory of 24-year-old who died in custody in 2016

Authorities also banned demonstrations in Lille on Saturday, while in Marseille, a march against police violence was re-routed bypassing the city centre.

Accusations of racism

France’s foreign ministry denied on Saturday that the country’s legal system is racist, a day after the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) called on French authorities to address the “structural and systemic causes of racial discrimination, including in law enforcement.”

“Any accusation of systemic racism or discrimination by law enforcement in France is unfounded,” the French diplomacy ministry said in a statement.

Main photo source: EPA/YOAN VALAT



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