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Popular fruit will become more expensive. “The costs will be passed on to consumers.”

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Avocado cultivation areas may shrink by up to several dozen percent by 2050 due to ongoing climate change, according to a new report by Christian Aid. – Producing avocados is becoming more and more expensive, and the costs will be passed on to consumers by increasing the price we pay for our guacamole, explains Honor Eldridge, an expert on sustainable food policy and author of the book “The Avocado Debate”.

It is common knowledge that growing avocados has a negative impact on the environment – due to the large amount of water it requires. The high demand for water also makes avocados “particularly vulnerable to climate change in a warmer, drier and more drought-prone world,” said a report by Christian Aid published on Monday. supporting sustainable development.

Avocados and climate change

The report states that areas considered suitable for growing avocados will decrease by 14%. up to 41 percent by 2050, depending on how quickly global CO2 emissions decline. IN Mexico, which is the largest avocado producer in the world, the area under cultivation may decrease by 31%. over the next quarter of a century – even if the average global temperature increase is limited to below 2 degrees Celsius, and by as much as 43% if the average global temperature rises significantly.

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Avocado plantation in CaliforniaDavid McNew/Getty Images

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Christian Aid is calling on governments to commit to urgent emissions reductions and accelerating the transition away from fossil fuels towards clean, renewable energy. “Without action by governments to reduce emissions, (avocados) face an uncertain future,” the report said. The organization also wants to provide greater financial support to farmers for whom avocado cultivation is the main source of income.

– Farming communities in developing countries are already bearing the brunt of the climate crisis and feeding their families. They care about a stable and predictable climate. That is why it is so important that they receive much more financial support to adapt to the changing climate, says Mariana Paoli, head of the global support team at Christian Aid, quoted in the press release.

On average, 320 liters of water are needed to produce one avocado.Shutterstock

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Production is becoming more and more expensive, costs transferred to consumers

Honor Eldridge, an expert on sustainable food policy and author of the book “The Avocado Debate”, notes that each growing region faces different challenges, but one issue affects them all: – Avocados require a lot of water. On average, 320 liters of water are needed to produce one avocado, he emphasizes. This is about four times more than for growing, for example, oranges. As he adds, “many countries”, including Peru and Columbia, are already struggling with water shortages. “Avocado production is therefore becoming more and more expensive, and the costs will be passed on to consumers by increasing the price we pay for our guacamole,” explains Eldridge.

– IN Burundi climate changes are a huge problem, especially for avocado growers. We are experiencing high temperatures, heavy rainfall and (soil) erosion, which has a disastrous impact on farmers' productivity and their incomes, says avocado farmer Jolis Bigirimana, quoted by Christian Aid.

The world is getting hotterPAP/Reuters

Avocado in Europe

Increasing heatwaves are also putting avocado crops in Europe at risk. Christian Aid points to estimates that the avocado harvest in Spain in 2023 they were to be 60 percent. smaller than in 2022 because The Iberian Peninsula has faced many heatwaves over the last year.

Main photo source: Shutterstock



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