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The crater divided the olive grove into two parts. The post-quake landscape is heartbreaking, but news of survivors keeps coming

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Twelve days have passed since the tragic earthquake that hit Turkey and Syria. Three people were pulled out of the rubble on Saturday. It is estimated that the total number of fatalities exceeds 46,000 and, according to the authorities, this is not the end of the tragic balance. The survivors face a new, unpleasant reality. Aid organizations are appealing for support for the victims.

Twelve days after a powerful earthquake hit the Turkish-Syrian border, rescuers in Turkey’s Hatay province rescued three people on Saturday. According to the Turkish news agency Anatolia, search and rescue teams pulled a woman, a man and a child from the rubble of a collapsed building in one of the districts of the city of Antioch. They managed to survive 296 hours under the rubble.

For the past week, rescuers have continued to find people alive in the rubble, even though they have been stuck under the rubble for days in freezing weather. Unfortunately, the number of people who can be saved is getting smaller and smaller.

It’s not over yet

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The total death toll from the earthquake now stands at over 46,000. Official figures from Turkey say more than 40,000 people have been killed, and 2,000 have died in Syrian areas controlled by the government in Damascus. According to UN sources, 4,400 people died in rebel-held areas. In total, approx. 122 thousand. were injured.

The force of the earthquake caused enormous damage. In Turkey alone, some 264,000 buildings were destroyed. Rescuers are still searching for signs of life under the rubble. As a result of the quake, a large crater appeared in the vicinity of Tepehan, which divided an olive grove in two. The resulting formation completely changed the appearance of the region.

A crater formed after an earthquakePAP/EPA/MARTIN DIVISEK

A crater formed after an earthquakePAP/EPA/MARTIN DIVISEK

A crater formed after an earthquakePAP/EPA/MARTIN DIVISEK

Help is still needed

Many of the survivors of the quake are homeless. In the city of Adiyaman, homeless people have been placed in makeshift tents, where they are trying to adapt to the new reality. According to data provided by the services, over 29,000 tents have been set up. The same is true in other regions, including Kahramanmarasa. Shelters for survivors are located mainly on sports fields and stadiums.

Earthquake in Turkey. Tens of thousands of people homelessReuters

Earthquake in Turkey. Tens of thousands of people homelessReuters

Aid organizations say that many months after the quake, the inhabitants of the affected regions will need humanitarian and financial support. The United Nations (UN) on Thursday issued an appeal for more than $1 billion in aid for Turkey and $400 million for Syria.

On Saturday, the head of the World Food Program (WFP) called on the authorities in northwestern Syria to stop blocking access to the area as hundreds of thousands of people are in urgent need of help. Already last week, the agency reported that there was a shortage of food supplies and called for the opening of more border crossings with Turkey.

Earthquake in Turkey. Tens of thousands of people homelessReuters

Earthquake in Turkey. Tens of thousands of people homelessReuters

Earthquake in Turkey and Syria

The epicenter of the 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck southeastern Turkey and northwestern Syria on Monday, February 6, was in the Turkish province of Kahramanmaras. Less than 12 hours later, a second 7.7-magnitude quake occurred several dozen kilometers to the north. Both phenomena were accompanied by a series of over 100 aftershocks.

The affected region of south-eastern Turkey and north-western Syria is seismically active and tremors are frequent. However, the latter is the most powerful cataclysm of this type in this region in recent times. In 1999, an earthquake in Izmit, Turkey, killed 17,000-18,000 people. Measurements showed that the quake had a magnitude of 7.6.

The deadliest earthquake in the history of seismic measurements was recorded in 1976 in the Chinese province of Tangshan. The official figures of the authorities spoke of 250,000 victims. They were probably greatly underestimated, because some sources gave the number of people killed as high as 650,000. The Tangshan cataclysm had an official magnitude of 7.5 on the Richter scale, although other measurements indicated as high as 8.2. The magnitude 9.5 was the strongest ever measured quake, in 1960, in Chile. More than 1,650 people died then.

Strong earthquake in Turkey and SyriaPAP

Main photo source: PAP/EPA/MARTIN DIVISEK



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