15.8 C
London
Wednesday, July 24, 2024

They want to kill a million crows in Kenya

Must read

- Advertisement -


The Kenyan government has announced a plan to eliminate oriental crows. According to the national wildlife conservation service, this invasive species displaces native species, transmits diseases and disturbs residents and tourists. As the authorities explain, the elimination of these birds is part of legal measures aimed at controlling the problematic pest.

Oriental crow (Corvus splendens), also known as the Indian crow, Ceylon crow or Colombo crow, comes from Asia and was brought to East Africa at the end of the 19th century. First, to Zanzibar, where the crows were supposed to cleanse the island of carrion and organic waste. However, they were quickly considered pests and fought against. A reward was paid for each dead crow or its egg brought home.

From Zanzibar, crows spread to continental Africa, and thanks to their extraordinary adaptability, by the 1980s they had taken over the entire eastern coast of the continent. Their population, despite repeated attempts at mass poisoning and shooting, is constantly growing.

The government has decided to eliminate one million crows by the end of the year.

Services: transmit diseases, displace native species

- Advertisement -

The Kenya Wildlife Conservation Service (KWS), explaining the need to fight crows, in a statement published last Saturday, emphasized the burdensome nature of these birds, describing them as invasive, harassing society for decades.

According to the services preparing to exterminate them, oriental crows not only displace native bird species, but also transmit diseases and destroy crops. As it was added, the birds disturb the peace of residents and tourists by squawking and attacking restaurant tables with food leftovers.

Oriental crowShutterstock

At a meeting with hoteliers, veterinarians and animal defenders, it was explained that the elimination of these birds was part of the legal measures aimed at controlling the problematic pest.

Main photo source: Shutterstock



Source link

More articles

- Advertisement -

Latest article