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Tuesday, March 5, 2024

Typhoon Mawar. Mawar is coming to Japan. In Guam, it caused serious damage

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Tropical Storm Mawar passes by Japan. In the southern part of the island of Honshu, it is expected to bring heavy rains, prompting authorities to issue evacuation orders for more than a million people. Guam, where Mawar hit a week ago, is still recovering from the effects of the element.

Typhoon Mawar, which hit Guam last week in the Pacific, heading northeast. After hooking the Philippines and Taiwan, the phenomenon weakened and became storm tropical. However, Japan’s Meteorological Agency (JMA) has warned that even a weaker typhoon could pose a threat.

Evacuations and canceled flights

Although Mawar will most likely pass south of Honshu, Japan’s largest island, the moist air it transports could bring with it unusually heavy rains. As similar weather events have caused flooding and landslides in the past, nearly 1.3 million people have been advised to evacuate.

The weather conditions also caused traffic difficulties. By Friday noon, just over 300 flights and 52 ferry services had been cancelled. Several railway lines have been closed.

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The JMA has issued flood and landslide warnings for the western parts of the islands of Shikoku and Honshu. According to forecasts, up to 350 liters of rain per square meter could fall in places within 24 hours. On Friday, Shikoku already recorded rainfall of 162.5 l / sq m. within three hours.

Tropical Storm Mawar off the coast of JapanNASA WorldView

Long cleaning

On Guam, where Mawar hit with the force of a super typhoon, recovery from the effects of the element is underway. A week after the storm passed, most of the island’s residents were still without access to electricity, water and communication services. The island’s governor, Lou Leon Guerrero, said that 80 to 85 percent of the work to restore power and running water will likely be completed in four to six weeks.

The people of Guam are acutely affected by the lack of basic necessities. Although many households have electricity generators, they are running out of fuel.

– I turn the generator on and off depending on what I need to do. It’s turned off for most of the day unless I’m cooking meals or reheating leftovers,” a resident of the island told The Guardian.

The scale of the damage after Typhoon MawarMaxar/Reuters

Main photo source: NASA WorldView



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